Let’s talk about…

20140220-002212.jpg

Did you know that 1/3 of all routine health maintenance visits with teens don’t include ANY discussion of sex or sexual health? Like, NONE?

And in those visits that do, the conversation lasts an average of 36 seconds?

I’ve been told I’m a fast talker. But if I tried to cram everything sex-related that I wanted to talk about into 36 seconds, I’d sound like an auctioneer on Adderall – and I’d STILL be providing my patients with lousy and inadequate counseling about their sexual health.

So, health care providers, what’s the deal? Don’t pretend it doesn’t occur to you that your teen patients might be having, or at least be thinking (constantly) about having, sex. It hasn’t been THAT long since you were a hormone-fueled adolescent yourself, has it?

Nope. Providers aren’t avoiding The Talk because it doesn’t occur to them. They’re avoiding it because it feels uncomfortable. The sense that you’re asking someone you barely know to discuss the most intimate details of their life feels vaguely icky. Far easier to ask a few general questions about how your patient has been feeling, chat about their plans for the summer, maybe (just maybe) ask about smoking, sign a few forms for school and send them on their way.

It used to make me feel uncomfortable too. But changing the way I thought about taking a sexual history and talking about sexual health with patients made things a little easier.

1) First of all: Get over it. You need to get used to talking sex with your patients. ESPECIALLY if you’re caring for teens and young adults. There’s just no way to do this job well without it. I’m not saying you should feel like you have to talk condoms with every patient who comes to see you about their runny nose… but you and I both know your patients are coming to you with more than runny noses.

2) Create a little script for yourself. Practice it. The less time you spend in the visit fishing around in the dark abyss in your mind for the next question, the less opportunity there is for the awkwardness to expand and grow to fill the void left by your silence. Know that the more you do it, the easier it gets. Pinky swear.

3) You may think that the fact that your patient isn’t bringing it up means they don’t want to talk about it. Unlikely. More likely, they’re feeling just as uncomfortable as you are, yet they also have a million sex-related questions and thoughts and worries, and they’re just waiting for an excuse to pretend to reluctantly be dragged into a conversation about it.

4) From your perspective, you’re asking about morbidity and risk factors: exposure, prophylaxis, pregnancy risk, infection risk, symptoms. But think about it from the patient’s perspective: what you’re really asking about is relationships. The guy who asked them out once and texts every once in awhile just to keep them hanging on. The girl they dated for a whole semester until they broke up, and now she’s dating your best friend…but they might have hooked up again that one time a few weeks ago. Framing the history as a series of stories allows your patient to tell you what’s going on in a familiar language, as well as providing you with context that you just won’t get with a few yes or no answers.

5) The more presumptuous and judgey the questions (“You’re using condoms, right?”), the less likely it is that you’ll get the full story, or that your counseling will make much of an impact. Is actively shutting down an open, honest conversation actually worse than no attempt at all? Well, probably not. But this isn’t a race for the bottom. (No pun intended.) You can do better.

Any other suggestions? Were you as surprised as I was by the results of this study? What do you think we can do as health care providers to improve these numbers?

Advertisements

One thought on “Let’s talk about…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s